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Research Ethics/Article Retraction

Predatory Publishing

How "Junk science ends up masquerading as legitimate research" -- CBC/Radio-Canada video

"An ISSN can be obtained relatively easily via either a national or international office as long as a journal can be identified as an existing publication. As the ISSN’s own website states an ISSN is “a digital code without any intrinsic meaning” and does not include any information about the contents of that publication. Perhaps most importantly, an ISSN “does not guarantee the quality or the validity of the contents”. This perhaps goes some way to explain why predatory journals can often include an ISSN on their websites. Indeed, more than 40% of the journals included in Cabells’ Predatory Reports database include an ISSN in their journal information.

But sometimes predatory publishers can’t obtain an ISSN – or at least can’t be bothered to – and will fake the ISSN code. Of the 6,000 or so journals with an ISSN in Predatory Reports, 288 or nearly 5% have a fake ISSN, and this is included as one of the database’s behavioural indicators to help identify predatory activity. It is instructive to look at these fake ISSNs to see the lengths predatory publishers will go to in order to achieve some semblance of credibility in their site presence." -- https://blog.cabells.com/2020/12/02/what-to-know-about-issns/

Like an ISSN, a DOI (Digital Object Identifier) does not imply that an article is good or bad.  Many predatory publications do have a legitimate DOI assigned.

No single nation has cornered the market on predatory publishing or unethical acts.  There are unscrupulous players everywhere, the U.S. being no exception.  No matter where research is produced and published, scholars should make every effort to ensure that the literature they are citing is authentic and a result of genuine scholarly research.

According to librarian Jeffrey Beall, "many publishers create companies in the United States- state of Delaware and use a Delaware address to make it appear they are based in my country. Anyone can create a company registered in Delaware by visiting a website and paying a small fee. The registration companies allow those who create new companies to use their addresses. So, many predatory publishers who claim to be based in the U.S. are not and are using deception to trick people..." -- https://elephantinthelab.org/a-center-of-predatory-publishing/

No single nation has cornered the market on predatory publishing and unethical acts.  There are unscrupulous players everywhere, no country is immune.  No matter where research is produced and published, scholars should make every effort to ensure that the literature they are citing is authentic and a result of genuine scholarly research.